Piya Chattopadhyay moderates What Matters Now events

Piya Chattopadhyay is going on a road trip with Research Matters. She has agreed to moderate all five What Matters Now events in Hamilton, London, Thunder Bary, Kingston and the GTA. It’s a pleasure to have her on board.

Piya is a familiar voice in the Canadian media landscape. She’s a moonlighting broadcast host at Canada’s foremost public broadcasters—the CBC and TVO. Piya can frequently be heard hosting programs including The Current, The World at Six, and Metro Morning on CBC Radio One. Piya is also the summer and fill-in host of the nightly current affairs program The Agenda with Steve Paikin on TVO.

Piya has been a working journalist for more than 15 years—covering a vast range of stories domestically and internationally, most notably the SARS Epidemic, the Asian Tsunami, the war in Afghanistan, and violent conflicts throughout the Middle East.

She spent three years living in Jerusalem and covering stories throughout the region as the Middle East correspondent for US-based Fox News Radio.

Aside from work, Piya has her hands full (actually, overflowing) as the mom of a 3 year old daughter, and infant identical twin boys.

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