Meet the Research Matters Student Ambassadors

If you’re wondering who the poetry reciters are in the teaser video for the Research Matters Virtual Scavenger Hunt, they are students from across the province who have agreed to volunteer as Ambassadors for Research Matters. They are undergrads and graduate students, from a range of disciplines.

You’ll see those same faces (and many more) throughout the course of of the hunt – all the video clues are delivered by Research Matters Ambassadors.

We are so delighted to be working with this group of students. In addition to sharing a passion for communicating research, they are imaginative, creative and fun. If you’re on an Ontario university campus and want to find out more about research happening at your institution and at many others, you could do worse than to make contact with your local ambassador.

If you don’t know how to contact them directly, send Research Matters a note at RMAmbassadors@cou.on.ca

Algoma University
Mandy Ehnes
Colin Elder

Brock University
Jory Korobanik
Julia Polyck-O’Neill

Carleton University
Vinita Ambwani
Brian Crosland

University of Guelph
Melanie Wills

Lakehead University
Erica Sawula

Laurentian University
Jason Corcoran
Mallory Leduc

McMaster University
Benjamin Davis-Purcell

Nipissing University
Zach Rawluk

OCAD University
Hudson Pridham

Univeristy of Ottawa
Christopher Sherif Mansour
Marie-Eve Larivière

Queen’s University
Troy Sherman
Saba Farbodkia

Royal Military College of Canada
Stephen Andrews

Ryerson University
Jason Wang
Megan Stuhlberg
Tara Sadeghian

University of Toronto
Lisa Esteves
Mabel Wong

Trent University
Latchmi Raghunanan

University of Ontario Institute of Technology
Samantha Skinner

University of Waterloo
Tim Leshuk

Western Univeristy
Joe Stinziano

Wilfrid Laurier University
Aniq Hakim

University of Windsor
Rami Gherib
Kelly Carr
Maria van Duinhoven

York University
Gunish Hothi
Ban Kattan

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