In The News

Global News: Canadian scientists want you to stay in bed for space research

March 21, 2016

Canadian researchers are taking an upside-down approach to better understand the impact of long-term space flight on the human body. Teams at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia and the University of Ottawa will monitor 20 test subjects slated to spend two months completely bedridden and lying head below feet at a slightly inverted, six-degree angle. The researchers will head to a specialized research facility in France to gather information from the inverted test subjects, whose positions are intended to imitate the conditions experienced by astronauts in zero gravity.

University Affairs: A novel solution to tattoo regret

March 21, 2016

Tattoos appear to be gaining in popularity. According to Deborah Davidson, associate professor of sociology at York University, whose research includes commemorative tattoos and tattoo culture, approximately 38 percent of Millennials have at least one tattoo and 19 percent have more than one; about one in five people across all age categories have a tattoo. No doubt at least some of these inked individuals later consider their tattoos a mistake. Enter Alec Falkenham, a PhD student in pathology at Dalhousie University who is developing a topical cream that works to eventually fade tattoos painlessly. Currently, the most popular removal method is by laser, which can come with side-effects like burning and scarring. Mr. Falkenham is currently working with Dalhousie’s Industry Liaison and Innovation Office to commercialize the cream.

CTV News: Maple syrup could protect against Alzheimer’s, research suggests

March 21, 2016

It is one of Canada's most famous and sweetest exports, and now it’s gaining recognition in the medical community for its potential health benefits. At a summit of the American Chemical Society in San Diego, Calif., earlier this week, scientists out of the University of Toronto and the University of Rhode Island indicated that maple syrup has shown promise in protecting brain cells against the damage found in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, in particular Alzheimer's.

U of T News: U of T’s Ken Welch leads international team on hummingbird research

March 21, 2016

An international team of researchers led by Associate Professor Ken Welch will explore in greater detail the metabolic marvels of the hummingbird thanks to a $1.6 million grant from the Human Frontier Science Program. The goal of the project is to bring together researchers with expertise in molecular biology, genomics, molecular biophysics and physiology in order to gain a more complete picture of hummingbird metabolic performance from the molecular level all the way up to the bird itself.

London Free Press: Jorn Diedrichsen helping stroke victims regain use of their hands

March 15, 2016

Here’s a jolt for anyone who’s ever tried to learn a difficult piano riff: a zap of electricity helps. That’s just one finding in the body of research by a European scientist drawn to London by high-powered imaging devices and Western’s University’s Brain and Mind Institute. Jörn Diedrichsen, now Western’s research chair in motor control and computational neuroscience, came to London by a circuitous route: Born in Germany, where he attended university, he did graduate work at top U.S. schools — the University of California at Berkeley and Johns Hopkins in Baltimore — then worked nine years at England’s University College London.

570 News: University of Guelph professor raises concerns over pesticide effects on ability of bumblebees to learn

March 15, 2016

A new study co-authored by a University of Guelph professor is raising serious concerns about the impact on bumblebees of exposure to pesticides. The study, published in Functional Ecology, found that even low exposure to pesticides can hinder the ability of bumblebees to learn the skills they need to collect nectar and pollen. While several studies have been conducted on the effects of pesticides on the honeybee population, the findings released today are the first to explore how the chemicals may affect the ability of bumblebees to forage from common wildflowers.