In The News

The Conversation: STEAM not STEM – Why scientists need arts training

January 24, 2018

In 1959, the British physicist and novelist C.P. Snow delivered a famously controversial lecture at Cambridge University. He described a post-war schism between two groups — scientists and the literary world. Snow identified this as a newly emergent divide, across which each party was more than happy to sneer at the other: Scientists proudly unable to quote a phrase of Shakespeare, and literary types untroubled by the second law of thermodynamics. Those divisions within the university seem now more deeply entrenched than ever before. And those working within the arts and the sciences face a third antagonist in society: Populism, with its attendant and increasing distrust of intellectuals. Read the full article here.

Ottawa Citizen: Science of winter – How being cold keeps you warm

January 4, 2018

When François Haman ran into some Algonquin College students from Senegal, they were piling on as many layers as they could to keep out the cold. Don’t do that, he advised them. Haman studies cold at the University of Ottawa, more specifically how the human body reacts to cold and what we can do about it. This is not just theory for him. He also spends a lot of time in Northern Ontario, he travels with hunters there, and he skis. “This is one thing that was very difficult for them,” he said about the Senegalese students. “I tried to explain to them it’s OK to be cold in the winter. They were actually terrified. They were going: ‘I am not going out. There’s no way.’ They were worried their skin was going to freeze. So I said, Make sure you cover it but don’t cover it too much.” Read the full article here.